information

Sometimes too much information is not a good thing.

In all the research I have done for the kind of surgery rescue dog Lily had I learned what it was, what to expect in recovery, when she could begin to use her leg, some caveats, how much better the recovery is than other surgeries.

All good. Until today.

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In doing more research for Lily’s current stage I learned the plate they put in can be rejected.

I am not normally prone to panic, but this surgeon/vet is tacit in her directions and instructions for supporting Lily almost as if I need to read her mind. Do these people truly have that much of a problem explaining things? It’s very frustrating.

Lily seems to be doing ok. Her leg is not swollen. She walks with almost no limp. I was told to put her back on anti-inflammatory meds because her xrays showed inflammation and swelling. No one showed me, just told me.

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I realize all dogs are different. I realize I know Lily better than this surgeon. I realize the procedure she had on this leg is much different from the lateral band procedure she had the first surgery. But that one, her vet told us to get her walking soon, walk her slowly but daily to ensure her muscles did not atrophy.

In this case she has been absolutely immobile for almost 5 weeks. Very strange for her.

Like dead calm at sea.

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At some point momentum has to start again.

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10 thoughts on “information

  1. good for u for staying in the know for Lulu

    i always wondered how vets (docs in general) learn how to tell someone their health is going downhill, when all theyve learned for years n years is to be book/lab smart

  2. I am not myself a patient woman. However, there can be a time for patience, too. I came across this post on internal fixation in dogs https://wagwalking.com/treatment/internal-fixation. It reads in part: “Rest is essential until the bone has fused and regained its own innate strength. Weight bearing and exercise ahead of this puts undo stress on the implant which could loosen or break…An average time to healing of non-complex fractures is 8 to 12 weeks…” I suggest you raise your concerns w/ the vet. Hope this helps! ❤

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